• In Brief
  • Want More?
  • Accessible Resources

The countdown is on. 2030 is fast approaching and the invisible processes of the Earth are making themselves seen. 

The latest science shows that while things are looking dire, we still have a chance to determine the course of the future. We each have a part to play, as do the corporations that will shape our collective futures. What can we change before it’s too late?

 

As the digital clock counts down to a year in the not-so-distant future, we are presented with an immersive underwater scene that, with human touch, represents what is happening to our planet right now. The installation ‘Time Reveals the Unseen’ confronts the viewer with climate impacts and environmental issues including melting ice caps, coral bleaching, ocean pollution and ecosystem collapse revealing the extent of human impact on the planet.

The realities of climate change are here, yet awareness is not new. The first World Climate Conference was hosted in 1979 but it wasn’t until the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015 that the Climate Crisis entered the forefront of the media and became common knowledge. But still, we are traveling fast towards crossing the global warming level of 1.5°C. The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Report, released in 2021 shows that human actions still have the potential to determine the future course of climate. The evidence is clear that carbon dioxide (CO2) is the main driver of climate change, and we need to strive for zero CO2 emissions. 

This interactive installation asks the viewer to consider their own place within this crisis and not continue in the path of previous generations, unable to see the science of Climate Change. I believe we as humans need to take control, individually, as a community and globally to combat the most urgent issue of our time.

— Yandell Walton

***

 Yandell Walton is an artist whose work encompasses projection, installation, and digital media that meld architectural space with the digital image. Walton has become recognised for her immersive installations that merge the actual with the virtual to investigate notions of impermanence in relation to environmental, social and political issues.

Driven by emotional responses to our increasingly damaged planet, her recent research investigates ecological shifts in the landscape due to human impact. Driven by emotional responses to our increasingly damaged planet, her recent research investigates ecological shifts in the landscape due to human impact.

 

Discover More:

Watch:

Listen:

Read:

Audio description to come

Audio layer transcript